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IBC Aquaponics

A place for IBC tote systems to share what they have learned and system designs.

Members: 151
Latest Activity: 7 hours ago

Discussion Forum

Wintering your IBC tote/ fish tank

Started by Angela Pierce. Last reply by Jim Fisk Mar 4. 21 Replies

This is my first year with Tilapia in an IBC tote, I have them in my greenhouse. I am wondering what others will do for winter? Ie, insulating tank, running grow beds, heater???Continue

getting rid of algea

Started by Bob Gee. Last reply by Jeff S Feb 25. 9 Replies

We have our system in an enclosed green house and was wondering if anyone has any helpful tips on how to get rid of algea. It's in the tanks, growbeds and even the greenhouse cover. Does anyone know…Continue

How Do You Plumb Your IBC Fish Tank?

Started by Jim Fisk. Last reply by Jim Fisk Jan 5. 16 Replies

I erroneously put this discussion on Page 2. Not really sure anyone will find page 2. For now I'll leave it there but wanted you all to know it existed. Continue

Suitable Water Totes

Started by Curt Decker. Last reply by Curt Decker Dec 23, 2013. 7 Replies

I'm at @$120 for foof grade tote OR tote that had water soluble glue which peels out like dried paint @ $60.In Phoenix AZ. looking to buy 2 totes. Which way do I jump? Thanks. All comments welcome.Continue

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Comment by Jim Fisk 7 hours ago

I came upon an old Trout raising book and thought this quote to be of interest. Source at the end.

"I think it is safe to say that sluggish flat water at 70 is dangerous,
if not fatal, to trout ; while they will live in vigorous
rapid water which occasionally runs to 80. I have
found 85 to be fatal to them in all kinds of water."
Source:
JAMES R. OSGOOD AND COMPANY, LATE TICKNOR & FIELDS, AND FIELDS, OSGOOD, & Co.1873

Good stuff. Keep your Trout water rolling!

Comment by Jim Fisk on April 11, 2014 at 12:57pm

Black pipe is the right one. It comes in various gauges but the thicker the longer lasting.

Comment by Jeff S on April 11, 2014 at 12:19pm

Jim, Thanks for the info. I am reworking the heater this year. Your system sounds cool but complicated to a simpleton like me. Can I use the black stove pipe and be safe with proper clearance? I built a fireproof closet for the stove but it wasn't emitting enough heat to have been a problem probably because it's an incinerator and not a stove and has a double wall.

Comment by Jim Fisk on April 11, 2014 at 10:06am

Jeff, I would be negligent if I did not point out that that is not a "duct" in your photo but a chimney that WILL load up with very flammable creosote and when (not if) it catches fire you are going to be in big trouble. Even that metal duct tape is meant for hot air ducts rather than chimneys. All that flammable material around it can easily catch fire. Take it from a veteran volunteer fireman who has been heating with wood for 50 yrs now. I have had a chimney fire split a new lined brick chimney right in half. 2000F in that "duct" will set everything around it on fire.The more you cool the air in the chimney the more it will form creosote. And that galvanized hot air duct pipe is also not safe for a chimney. When it is super heated in a chimney fire situation it gives off very toxic fumes. Please do your homework on heating with any kind of solid fuels and the appropriate materials that should be used. You seem convinced that you are dealing with "hot air" and take my word for it: you are not. Be safe.

Comment by Jim Fisk on April 11, 2014 at 9:48am

Hi Jeff, sorry I got no notice of your post.

My stove design is capable of a good 100K btus and that chamber on top is more complicated than it looks as it extracts most of the useable heat before it exits the GH. I can get the entire stove glowing red should I desire, so it must have room around it or PUFF goes the GH.

Before the flue gases leave the stove all the syngas (wood gas that normally goes unburned in the average stove) is burned at around 2000F in a ss chamber at the back of the lower barrel. The super heated exhaust then hits a replaceable baffle as it enters the upper chamber. Then it is directed to the front end and then up over a second baffle and toward the rear and finally into the flue and out of the GH into a metalbestos stovepipe chimney. You must have some heat left to drive the exhaust up and out unless you use a draft inducer at that end.

The heat output is controlled by a digital thermostat that drives an inlet fan that goes on and off depending on demand. The inlet fan air is preheated before it hits the syngas burner tube and the resultant burn can sound quite impressive. The next gen design (I have been designing these wood gasifiers since the mid 70's) will be even more impressive and clean burning. Hope to have that one on line for the house by Fall. I will reveal more on that in the future. Wood gasifiers are all the rage now. Ben Franklin was actually the pioneer on them and pretty much never gets any credit as everyone reinvents the wheel. Nothing new there.

If you do decide to heat the water as I do in this stove be sure to have a valve to control the flow of cold water as the resultant condensation can wreak havoc with your stove if not throttled back so as to stay warm. That very acidic condensation will eat thru most stoves unless made of ss.

As to pics, just go to your home page and load them up. Start by clicking on this button:

Comment by Jeff S on April 8, 2014 at 8:58am

Jim, I notice your wood burner exits directly out of the GH. I built a separate closet to accommodate my incinerator and found I was loosing most of the heat. I decided to loop the duct work into the GH with a fan blowing down on it. Works great! I'm going to lengthen the GH this summer and move the incinerator to one end and run the exhaust through the rafters to the other end to capitalize on all the heat. Even thinking about running water through the ducts to heat the tanks (in tubing off course). Hope the attachments work. Haven't figured out how to create a library for pics here.    IMG_20140317_085517_978.jpg   IMG_20140317_085533_622.jpg 

Comment by Jim Fisk on April 7, 2014 at 8:28pm

That's what kept us growing down to 20 below. Winter crops did very well and the trout grew to 18". We love Winter gardening. Should have been doing for years.

Comment by Jeff S on April 7, 2014 at 5:16pm

Keith, This was my first winter(not a good one to start) and I built a small GH and kept going. Fish production was good. Veggies grew but didn't produce. I've actually stopped trying to do any breeding. Don't have anywhere to put them but I have plans. Have 2 IBC totes for fish now. The fingerlings are in one and the 5 originals are in the other/sump tank. Fish seem to grow well in there. I have 1 3x4 GB. Just picked up 3 more IBCs for expansion this summer. I think I have a handle on how I'll expand the GH and control winter temps. Do you shut down in the winter.

Comment by Keith Langdon on April 7, 2014 at 4:25pm

1.00 ea they are 1-2"inches in size and he said he had about 600 of them.
I found him off Craigslist.
I am in the Kalamazoo area.

Running 4 grow beds to a sump back up to the fish tank.  
Adding thee towers and some bato buckets this year.

Right now just trying to thaw the ice in the sump so I can get it back up and running.

Comment by Jeff S on April 7, 2014 at 4:18pm

Well Keith next time you're in the west Detroit area and need some fish give me a shout or just drop by and say hi. I'm visiting in N.C. this week and did a tour of another guys operation yesterday. First system I've ever seen besides my own. BTW what did you pay for your fingerlings?

 
 
 

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